Arctic Wolf

Canis lupus arctos
The Arctic wolf is a subspecies of the Gray wolf that inhabits the Arctic regions of North America and Greenland. Arctic wolves are also known as “polar” wolves or “white” wolves. Arctic wolves have a coat of fur that is specially adapted to the extreme cold climate in which they live. The most prominent difference between arctic wolves and other Gray wolf subspecies is their all-white coat, which remains white throughout the year. Arctic wolves have sharp teeth and powerful jaws.

There are two widely recognized species of wolves in the world, the red and the gray.  However, there is debate over how many species of wolf exist and if there are different subspecies of the gray wolf.  Additionally, there is a little-known canid, which lives in the Ethiopian highlands called Canis simensis that is thought to be a very close relative of the wolf.

Subspecies of gray wolves in North America include the Arctic wolf (Canis lupus arctos), northwestern wolf (Canis lupus occidentalis), Great Plains wolf (Canis lupus nubilus), Mexican wolf(Canis lupus baileyi) and the eastern timber wolf (Canis lupus lycaon), which is debated by some as a distinct species, the eastern wolf (Canis lycaon).

To understand the importance of wolves to the environment please take the time to watch How Wolves Change Rivers.

DIET

The Arctic wolf is a subspecies of the Gray wolf that inhabits the Arctic regions of North America and Greenland. Arctic wolves are also known as “polar” wolves or “white” wolves. Arctic wolves have a coat of fur that is specially adapted to the extreme cold climate in which they live. The most prominent difference between arctic wolves and other Gray wolf subspecies is their all-white coat, which remains white throughout the year. Arctic wolves have sharp teeth and powerful jaws

FAST FACTS

Size: 2 – 2 1/2 feet height, 3 to 6 feet length
Weight: 75 – 150 lbs
Lifespan: 7-10 years in the wild.

CONSERVATION STATUS

LEAST CONCERNED